Home | Hotels | Hotels Video | China Flights | China Train Tickets | Main cities | China map | Contact us | Reservation Status  

China Travel & Tourism News


Search China Travel News:

3-D printed food leaps from fantasy to the table


06-Dec-2016 - China Daily
3-D printed food leaps from fantasy to the table
A honey-colored Venetian lion made out of sugar becomes an attraction at a recent Italian embassy event in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Leandro Rolon has a dream.

"Imagine," he says as we stroll through his Beijing design studio, Defacto. "You get up in the morning and your 3-D printer/oven has already created your custom breakfast bar. It's made for your taste and for your body's needs, because you did a saliva scan before you went to bed. So your oven knows if you have a hangover, or you're low on certain minerals. It also knows if you're spending the morning at the gym or sitting in an office."

We're going to see driverless cars on the road next year, he notes, and technology will push 3-D printing for uses like food equally fast. He'll be speaking on the topic on Wednesday at a "Future of Food" seminar at The Hatchery in Beijing.

"The first printers could only create items from a few materials, but now more than 200 materials can be used," he says. "Sugar. Chocolate. Plastics. Wood."

Rolon and his business partner, Austrian designer David Doepel, have moved quickly, too.

Trained as an architect, the chatty Rolon says he enjoyed that work but became frustrated because many commissioned structures are never built.

"Great drawings are nice," he says grinning, "but I wanted to actually see more of my work."

He decided that meant making stuff himself, and teaming up with the similarly passioned Doepel. They decided that the nascent 3-D printing technology would allow them to create in three fields they both enjoyed: architecture, fashion and food.

Architectural models and fantasy confections for pastry chefs are two obvious applications. Other projects were surprises.

"See that?" he asks, pointing to a mannequin wearing a facemask in the Defacto design workroom.

The molded human form has something that such figures generally don't, he says: ears. Their client needed to show its PM2.5 masks fitting properly on the face, so the Defacto team designed and molded heads with proper ears.

As they create a portfolio, Rolon and Doepel are finding they can fabricate all kinds of goods?edible or otherwise. Their designs have ranged from plate-sized company logos to an immense modular structure that set a Guinness World Record for the largest 3-D printed structure. That commissioned piece was an attraction at a recent suburban Chinese mall promotion.

Then there's the lion.

"The Italian embassy wanted something for a special event," says Rolon. "We played with several ideas, and finally came up with the Venetian lion." The mythical beast, about the size of a suitcase before they added an impressive pair of wings, was made out of sugar, and the honey-colored centerpiece drew lots of oohs and ahs at the gala dinner.

Sugar is a good material to work with, he adds. Chocolate, with its finicky melting temperatures, is less practical than the duo had initially hoped.

Fast-changing technology, they say, will soon allow more complicated creations, such as the daily-changing breakfast bar.

"Think about disaster relief," says Rolon. "You could drop a 3-D printer into the area with a helicopter or a drone, and people could make food with the raw material they have there."

Other ideas are a bit less noble.

"It would be amazing to make a Ferrari," he says with a huge grin. "If they won't hire us, we may just do it anyway."

Leandro Rolon has a dream.

"Imagine," he says as we stroll through his Beijing design studio, Defacto. "You get up in the morning and your 3-D printer/oven has already created your custom breakfast bar. It's made for your taste and for your body's needs, because you did a saliva scan before you went to bed. So your oven knows if you have a hangover, or you're low on certain minerals. It also knows if you're spending the morning at the gym or sitting in an office."

We're going to see driverless cars on the road next year, he notes, and technology will push 3-D printing for uses like food equally fast. He'll be speaking on the topic on Wednesday at a "Future of Food" seminar at The Hatchery in Beijing.

"The first printers could only create items from a few materials, but now more than 200 materials can be used," he says. "Sugar. Chocolate. Plastics. Wood."

Rolon and his business partner, Austrian designer David Doepel, have moved quickly, too.

Trained as an architect, the chatty Rolon says he enjoyed that work but became frustrated because many commissioned structures are never built.

"Great drawings are nice," he says grinning, "but I wanted to actually see more of my work."

He decided that meant making stuff himself, and teaming up with the similarly passioned Doepel. They decided that the nascent 3-D printing technology would allow them to create in three fields they both enjoyed: architecture, fashion and food.

Architectural models and fantasy confections for pastry chefs are two obvious applications. Other projects were surprises.

"See that?" he asks, pointing to a mannequin wearing a facemask in the Defacto design workroom.

The molded human form has something that such figures generally don't, he says: ears. Their client needed to show its PM2.5 masks fitting properly on the face, so the Defacto team designed and molded heads with proper ears.

As they create a portfolio, Rolon and Doepel are finding they can fabricate all kinds of goods?edible or otherwise. Their designs have ranged from plate-sized company logos to an immense modular structure that set a Guinness World Record for the largest 3-D printed structure. That commissioned piece was an attraction at a recent suburban Chinese mall promotion.

Then there's the lion.

"The Italian embassy wanted something for a special event," says Rolon. "We played with several ideas, and finally came up with the Venetian lion." The mythical beast, about the size of a suitcase before they added an impressive pair of wings, was made out of sugar, and the honey-colored centerpiece drew lots of oohs and ahs at the gala dinner.

Sugar is a good material to work with, he adds. Chocolate, with its finicky melting temperatures, is less practical than the duo had initially hoped.

Fast-changing technology, they say, will soon allow more complicated creations, such as the daily-changing breakfast bar.

"Think about disaster relief," says Rolon. "You could drop a 3-D printer into the area with a helicopter or a drone, and people could make food with the raw material they have there."

Other ideas are a bit less noble.

"It would be amazing to make a Ferrari," he says with a huge grin. "If they won't hire us, we may just do it anyway."
06-Dec-2016 - China Daily

Main Cities in China Travel and China Hotels

Beijing Hotels China Guangzhou Hotels China Shanghai Hotels China Hongkong Hotels China Qingdao Hotels China Hangzhou Hotels China
Beijing Canton Shanghai Hong Kong Qingdao Hangzhou



Search China Hotels China Hotels:
Please Select a City:
Find Your Hotel With China Map
Check-in:
Show Calendar
Check-out:
Show Calendar
Currency Adults Child

Search China Flight Ticket China Flight:
One Way Round-Trip
Departure city:
Destination:
Departure date:
Return date:




China Hotels info

Beijing Hotels, Shanghai Hotels
Guangzhou Hotels, Shenzhen Hotels
Hangzhou Hotels, Yiwu Hotels

China Travel info

Embassies and Consulates
China Health
China Currency
China Visa

China Tourist info

China Itineraries
Traditional Holidays
What to see in China
Weather in China

China Business info

Fairs and exhibitions
Shanghai Expo.
Canton Fair, Yiwu Fair
Institutional offices
China investment guide
Doing business in China

China Vacation info

China Map
China Travel Tourism News
Harbin Ice Lantern Festival
Hotels Reservation

China Province:

Hubei, Inner Mongolia
Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Tibet

China Cities:
China Introduction
Beijing Travel Info
Changchun Travel Info
Changsha Travel Info
Chengde Travel Info
Chengdu Travel Info
Chongqing Travel Info
Dali Travel Info
Dunhuang Travel Info
Guilin Travel Info
Haikou Travel Info
Hangzhou Travel Info
Harbin Travel Info
Nanning Travel Info
Ningbo Travel Info
Qingdao Travel Info
Shanghai Travel Info
Shenyang Travel Info
Shenzhen Travel Info
Suzhou Travel Info
Taian Travel Info
Tianjin Travel Info
Weihai Travel Info
Wuyishan Travel Info
Xiamen Travel Info
Xian Travel Info
Yangzhou Travel Info
Zhuhai Travel Info


 
| Home | Hotels | Hotels Video | China Flights | Flights Schedule | Pickup Service | Travel Packages | Affiliate | Add your hotels | Interprete Italiano-Cinese | Contact | Site Map | Link | FAQ | About Us
Copyright © 2001-2017 China Hotels Reservation - All Rights Reserved
Europe Office: ChinaHotelsReservation- Via Gerolamo Forni 64 - 20161 Milano - Fax 0291390522
China Office: China Travel(Hualv) Business co.,Ltd. - Tel 0086-577-88555070 Fax 0086-577-88552730
Xishan Donglu Xicen Gongyu 7 Zhuang 802 - 325005 Wenzhou China